April 2018

We met Patience in Cameroon last November. She is a 23 year old with mitral stenosis from Rheumatic heart disease.

 Patience (on the right) with her caregiver Christobel

Patience (on the right) with her caregiver Christobel

Patience was very restricted by her disease. Hardly able to carry out daily activities. Her family was very anxious to do what ever they could to give her a full life. Arrangements were made to have her flown to Kenya when we were there. We met her at the airport and drove with her and her caregiver to Tenwek hospital for a balloon valve procedure. On arrival at the hospital, she was barely able to walk the distance to her hospital room.

Patience was one of nine young people that we did the valve procedure on that trip. Thankfully all did well.

 Kenya crew April 2018 left to right Amalin Sorajja Gathum Reddy, Jonathan Schwartz, Paul Sorajja and Ron Johannsen. Not pictured Colleen Johannsen.

Kenya crew April 2018 left to right Amalin Sorajja Gathum Reddy, Jonathan Schwartz, Paul Sorajja and Ron Johannsen. Not pictured Colleen Johannsen.

A couple of days after her procedure Patience was up walking around the hospital grounds. It was a wonderful sight to see.

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When Patience returned home to Cameroon her family had a big celebration and her name was officially changed to Joy.

Remember Adokorach?

Do you remember Adokorach? She is the patient we met in DR Congo who had massive clots in her atrium. See blog Aug 9th 2016. She was put on long term anti-coagulation to deduce her risk of Stroke. We were eventually able to get her to Kenya when we were there and she had a her mitral valve replaced. We are happy to let you know that she had a successful delivery of her baby. With constant care from Dr. Pappy things went well. Merry Christmas.

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2017 Ethiopia Soddo Christian Hospital

 Teaching Rheumatic Heart Disease Screening

Teaching Rheumatic Heart Disease Screening

Our team is in Soddo Ethiopia to initiated a program for mass screening of young people for early signs of rheumatic heart disease. As we have mentioned before, if it is found early, the progression can be stopped with monthly penicillin shots. We had our first practice screening this past Saturday. Dr. Michelle Yates (in blue) invited the hospital staff to bring their children to be screened. The trainees took turns doing the ECHO and all looking and interpreting the results. We scanned about 80 kids and found 6 positives. That's 6 kids who can now go on penicillin and not suffer the debilitating effects of rheumatic heart disease.

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